Thursday, June 20, 2019

Women Photographers in the Republic, Women of the Cuban Photography Club


        
"Last Wednesday of the Month" Lecture
"Women Photographers in the Republic"
Wednesday, June 26; 6:30 - 8:30pm


This lecture offers an unprecedented approach to the role of women as a modernizing force in Cuban society, focusing on the existence of the Photographic Club of Cuba between 1935 and 1962. 

Aldeide Delgado, Founder and Director of Women Photographers International Archivewill discuss her findings while conducting research for her project, Catalog of Cuban Women Photographers

Conceived in 2013, this initiative aims to document and recognize the work of women photographers in Cuba. It is a platform for the investigation on women who contributed to the development of Cuban photography, the historical conditions of their artistic participation, and the topics in their works beginning in 1853 with the recovery of the first Cuban female photographer to the present. Women Photographers International Archive is a nonprofit organization that researches, promotes, supports and educates about the role of women and those identified as women in photography

$5 Members / $10 Non-Members

RSVP by June 21 to dayana@coralgablesmuseum.org or 305.603.8067.  

This lecture is presented with the additional support of 
Arts Connection and Women Photographers International Archive.

Wednesday, June 19, 2019

The Sunday Still: Haiti through a Haitian photographer’s lens

Photojournalist Patrick Farrell has joined the blog with his weekly feature, The Sunday Still. Farrell selects one image each week that showcases the best photojournalism by photojournalists from around the world. The feature runs weekly in The Sunday Long Read. The goal of the newsletter, edited by Don Van Natta Jr. and Jacob Feldman, is to put the week’s best journalism in your hands every Sunday morning.

The Sunday Still
from Patrick Farrell


Haiti through a Haitian photographer’s lens 

Born in Haiti, AP photographer Dieu Nalio Chery grew up learning his craft in his uncle’s photo studio. Today, if an image from Haiti stops you in your tracks, it’s likely it was shot by Chery, a 2015 Magnum Foundation Human Rights Fellow. Whether it’s young men learning to swim, commuting families piled on motorcycles or breaking news, Chery has an eye for composition and natural beauty. On June 9, he captured the anger of thousands of Port-au-Prince street protestors demanding the resignation of President Jovenel Moïse, who has been implicated in government audits for the misuse of billions of dollars in Venezuelan oil aid given to fight poverty in Haiti. Framed by burning vehicles and chaos in the background, one woman conveys a country’s frustration with its government in her anguished face and outstretched arms.

Patrick Farrell, the curator of The Sunday Still, is the 2009 Pulitzer Prize-winner for Breaking News Photography for The Miami Herald, where he worked from 1987 to 2019. He is currently a Lecturer in the Department of Journalism and Media Management at the University of Miami School of Communication.

Monday, June 10, 2019

The Sunday Still: They’ll Never Walk Alone

Photojournalist Patrick Farrell has joined the blog with his weekly feature, The Sunday Still. Farrell selects one image each week that showcases the best photojournalism by photojournalists from around the world. The feature runs weekly in The Sunday Long Read. The goal of the newsletter, edited by Don Van Natta Jr. and Jacob Feldman, is to put the week’s best journalism in your hands every Sunday morning.

The Sunday Still
from Patrick Farrell


They’ll Never Walk Alone

When shooting a parade, you can go tight or wide. Award-winning Press Association photographer Danny Lawson has great instinct for standing back and waiting to tell the story. He captured the Sunday Still a year ago when he shot a glowing Meghan Markle as she walked through shafts of light during the Royal Wedding. He nailed it again on June 2, when the Liverpool Football Club brought home for the sixth time the Champions League Trophy, the biggest prize in European football. Parading through Liverpool and a sea of celebrants perched on lamp posts, street signs and shoulders, the team’s bus crawled through red flare smoke and a “Where’s Waldo” crowd scene. Lawson’s photo conveys joy without showing a single person’s face.

Patrick Farrell, the curator of The Sunday Still, is the 2009 Pulitzer Prize-winner for Breaking News Photography for The Miami Herald, where he worked from 1987 to 2019. He is currently a Lecturer in the Department of Journalism and Media Management at the University of Miami School of Communication.

Thursday, June 6, 2019

PHOTO EXHIBIT: The Art of Compassion Friday, June 7 Coral Gables Museum



Grand Opening 
Friday, June 7th until Sept. 23
Coral Gables Museum, 285 Aragon Ave
Coral Gables, FL 33134

Erika Blanco, Steven Burton, Donato Di Camilo, Karli Evans, CW Griffin, Ekaterina Juskowski, Mary Beth Koeth, Allison Langer, Irina Lawton, Ashlyn Mckibben, Adrian Mesa, Milcho, Michelle Polissaint, Johanne Rahaman, Leesa Richardson, Starr Sariego, Mateo Serna, Sharon Socol,  Maggie Steber, and Alexandra Vivas
This exhibition compiles the work of twenty local and nationally renowned photographers who have been paired with formerly incarcerated women and asked to make a portrait of them while they are in the process of re-integration to society.  Artists delve on these women’s sense of belonging and on their concept of home. Their powerful photographs reveal the real women – mothers, daughters, and wives, who ended up behind bars. Photographs are complemented by the subjects’ powerful testimonies.
The Art of Compassion is curated by photographer and producer Starr Sariego and it is part of “The Compassion Project”. This initiative aims to redefine the preconceptions about formerly incarcerated women through photography, film, an interactive app, and a rich educational curricula, and works in collaboration with LEAP, an organization that empowers women to put prison in the past.


Tuesday, May 28, 2019

He brought hurricanes and Celia Cruz closer to us. Miami photographer C.M. Guerrero dies


LOCAL OBITUARIES

He brought hurricanes and Celia Cruz closer to us. Miami photographer C.M. Guerrero dies

 


Duration 2:19
Through the lens of C.M. Guerrero




Life through the lens of photojournalist C.M. Guerrero. 
Longtime photojournalist Carlos Manuel “C.M.” Guerrero, who spent more than three decades documenting moments of history for el Nuevo Herald and the Miami Herald, died Sunday following a long battle with congestive heart failure. He was 62.
Born in Santiago de Cuba in 1956, he was a toddler when his family joined thousands of other Cubans who ultimately fled the island and carved out a new life in the United States. He attended St. John the Apostle Catholic School in Hialeah, graduated from Miami Springs Senior High School and earned a degree from The Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale. 
He joined the Miami Herald Media Co. in November 1987 and, despite health issues years later, continued to work and to produce excellent visuals through the end of 2018, including stellar coverage of the aftermath of Hurricane Irma’s passage through South Florida. One of his most iconic photos was the result of another disaster: Hurricane Andrew in 1992.
Guerrero captured a haunting image of an elderly man standing in floodwater with a look as devastated as the destruction surrounding him. The Miami Herald won the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service for its coverage and service to the community in the wake of the storm.
“I loved what I did as a photographer, but it was time to move on [to] a new chapter of my life,” Guerrero wrote in an exchange with a reporter earlier this year after taking an early retirement. Few knew he was ill. 
Beyond natural disasters, Guerrero covered daily slices of life, sports, celebrities, crime and various large news events, including the international custody battle nearly 20 years ago involving a Cuban boy rescued at sea by the name of Elián González.
“My brother loved what he did,” said his sister Jenny Manzano. “He loved his work.”
Colleagues sent an outpouring of tributes, recalling him as a passionate journalist with a sense of humor and a knack for sharing compelling tales. 
“C.M. was a photo natural. It was basically impossible for him to take a bad image, even if he tried,” said Orlando Mellado, the visual editor at el Nuevo and the Miami Herald. “Old school, street-savvy, hard-nosed, he was adept at overcoming obstacles to get the job done.” 
“He was an outstanding photojournalist, vivid storyteller and incredible human being. His empathy for those whose lives he documented showed through his images,” said Nancy San Martín, managing editor of el Nuevo Herald. “He had a wonderful sense of humor, which always brought laughter to those lucky enough to be around him. We will miss his contribution to the work we do and his friendship.” 
Beyond photography, Guerrero loved life. He spent years riding motorcycles, taking in the South Florida scenery with friends. He enjoyed music, social gatherings and scrumptious meals. He also served as a mentor, sharing his knowledge and talent with younger journalists.
His generous nature touched many, leaving those who knew him grieving. 
“Broken Hearted! I can’t capture the essence of this man in words,” wrote a longtime friend in a string of emails shared by colleagues.
But perhaps he was most proud, as he liked to say, of being Cuban singer Celia Cruz’s favorite and personal photographer. Prior to her death, he traveled with the artist to the Naval base at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, and documented much of her career in the United States while developing a close relationship with her.
“His friendships reached far outside our photo circle,“ said colleague Emily Michot.
David Santiago, another fellow photojournalist, used one word to describe Guerrero: “Passionate.”
Guerrero was predeceased by his mother, Elba Guerrero, and two siblings, Alberto Guerrero and Sylvia Cancio. He is survived by his 99-year-old father, Adalberto Guerrero, three of five siblings — Eduardo Guerrero, Ileana García and Jenny Manzano — several nieces and nephews and other close relatives. Manzano, who was born in Miami and is the youngest of the siblings, said family members worried about his illness, took turns caring for him and watched helplessly as he suffered. 
“It is going to be very hard not to see him anymore, but we are at peace knowing that he is finally at rest,” she said. “His illness brought us closer together. I will cherish that forever.” 
A memorial service will be held from 7 to 11 p.m. Thursday at Vior Funeral Home, 291 NW 37th Ave. 
Photojournalist Patrick Farrell has joined the blog with his weekly feature, The Sunday Still. Farrell selects one image each week that showcases the best photojournalism by photojournalists from around the world. The feature runs weekly in The Sunday Long Read. The goal of the newsletter, edited by Don Van Natta Jr. and Jacob Feldman, is to put the week’s best journalism in your hands every Sunday morning.
The Sunday Still
from Patrick Farrell


Skyrockets in Flight

Freelance photographer Joe Rimkus Jr., who retired in 2013 from an amazing 40-year career at the Miami Herald, provides a ringside seat to Florida’s Space Coast from his dramatic Instagram feed. On May 23, he captured the launch of the Space X Falcon 9 rocket as it streaked across the sky from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Shooting from Jetty Park in Port Canaveral, his long exposure displayed the trail of fire cutting through clouds and darkness in an arc over the Atlantic Ocean, with the shadow of a lifeguard stand in the foreground providing a sense of place.

Patrick Farrell, the curator of The Sunday Still, is the 2009 Pulitzer Prize-winner for Breaking News Photography for The Miami Herald, where he worked from 1987 to 2019. He is currently a Lecturer in the Department of Journalism and Media Management at the University of Miami School of Communication.