Think Tank Photo

Sunday, August 21, 2011

Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee, knock out eight, it's Octomom in the ring!


Dropping the f-bomb, shooting the bird, Octomom dukes it out with local bartender Cassandra "Patience" Andersen at the Ocean Manor Resort on Miami Beach in Fort Lauderdale on August 20, 2011.

I never wanted to be a tabloid photographer or paparazzi but here I am banging away, shooting frames of Nadya Suleman, aka the Octomom, who came to international attention when she gave birth to octuplets. The controversial mom conceived them through in vitro fertilization.

Miami Herald writer Glen Garvin called the boxing match “an evening bizarre even by the standards of manufactured media events in what will doubtless be remembered as the golden age of faux fame.”

Using my finely honed photojournalistic skills I scanned the boxing ring, anticipating where to capture the most compelling images, while angling for a view of the crowd and their incredulous expressions.

That’s when the pseudo prosumer photographer piped up and asked the fight promoter to keep the media on one side of the ring so multiple flashes would not mess up his pictures.

Are you kidding me? I love it when I catch an errant strobe in the background. Sometimes you have to stand your ground so I piped up, expressed my concern and stood in a spot that would make famed photographer Robert Capa proud.  He once said, “If your pictures aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough.”


Capa may not have had "pulp journo" in mind but I can apply his approach just the same.



Photographer Al Diaz works the ropes. Photo by Michael Laughlin.

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Intersection of Greatness – The Legends Meet in Miami


Elvis Presley performing at the Olympia Theater in Miami, Florida, 1956.
Rare images of Ali, Elvis and the Beatles, discovered in an 8 X 10 Kodak paper box, were lost in time, stashed in a closet for decades. Charles Trainor Jr., the son of Miami News photographer Charles Trainor, found the negatives of the iconic images while helping his mother move from his childhood home in Miami. “I kept finding negatives everywhere,” Trainor said.

“I sat for weeks looking at every single frame and just finding gems that, at the, time weren’t considered maybe great images but 50 years later they are fantastic images!” Trainor said.

He is especially impressed with the Elvis pictures. “He was using a camera where there is one shot, BOOM! You would have to pull the film out, turn it around and put it back in. It took three minutes to shoot a picture. His composition, if you look at the photograph of Ali boxing with the kids, his lower angle of the house, that all leads into the subject.

“I have to give my dad credit” Trainor says. His father found an artsy way to record these celebrities. Aesthetically pleasing, technically proficient, the images stand the test of time.

Armando Arorizo, owner of The Perfect Exposure Gallery, met Trainor during the NBA Finals in Miami. “We sat for lunch at the AmericanAirlines Arena and I was told about the great images on film Charlie had discovered. “There is still a great demand for those early images shot on film. They are rare single frame shots, unlike today, with the click, click, click of a motor drive,” Arorizo said.

The reception opens at 6-9 tonight, August 18, at The Perfect Exposure Gallery 3519 West Sixth Street, Los Angeles, Ca. 90020.
Mohammad Ali and the Beatles at the 5th Street Gym on Miami Beach 1964

Intersection of Greatness-The Legends Meet in Miami features rare historical images of The Beatles, Elvis and Mohammad Ali captured against a Miami backdrop. This exhibit honors monumental anniversaries in pop history as 2011 marks 50 years since the Beatles had their first ever gig at The Cavern in Liverpool and 55 years since a trio of firsts for Elvis: RCA single release: Heartbreak Hotel, movie appearance: Love Me Tender and television appearances.

Charles Trainor (1927-1987) was a photographer in Miami from the 1950’s to the 1970’s. During the middle years of the last century Trainor crossed paths with subjects that would become icons in the present day. The photos of Elvis, The Beatles, and Ali not only defined his photography but also a city that was becoming a player on the world’s stage. Miami was the point in all three of their history where the world took noticed, two with concerts and one with a fight. Trainor’s dramatic photograph of the late U.S. President John F. Kennedy caught the attention of the late President who requested a copy of the photograph and returned one to Trainor with his signature. Over the years Trainor’s work was published in national and international publications: LIFE and LOOK Magazine, PARIS MATCH, GEO, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, ROLLING STONE Magazine and various books and documentaries.

The Perfect Exposure Gallery is the recognized venue in Southern California to display the work of award winning and accomplished photojournalists as well as works of photographers that regard artistry and craftsmanship as a standard of excellence. The mission of the Perfect Exposure Gallery is to present exhibits free of charge to the general public with the following goals to exemplify the rich variety and impact of photography, freedom of expression, a forum for the aesthetic, the contemptible and the sublime.

Magnum Photographer Eli Reed says, “If you are a serious photojournalist with work that means something to you. The Perfect Exposure Gallery is the perfect place to show your work.”


Opening Reception: Thursday, August 18th from 6-9pm
Exhibit Dates: August 19th – September 18th, 2011
Gallery Hours: Tuesday – Saturday 11am-5pm
Location: The Perfect Exposure Gallery 3519 West Sixth Street, Los Angeles, Ca 90020
Mohammad Ali in Miami, Circa 1960's.


http://bit.ly/RareAliBeatlesElvisPhotos




Thursday, August 4, 2011

To skin or not to skin, which component system do you use?

El Nuevo Herald Photographer Hector Gabino uses the Think Tank Photo Modular belt system while waiting for Miami Heat's LeBron James to show up at Media Day. El Nuevo Herald's Jose Iglesias using the Multimedia belt system. PGA photographer Stan Badz seems to believe Think Tank Photo should receive an award for the Modular Set!

WHAT IS A MODULAR COMPONENT SYSTEM AND WHO USES IT?

My friend Alex Kolyer called yesterday asking which Think Tank Photo belt system he should buy. "Skin or Modular?" He's not the first to ask. I told him I use the Modular belt system that has the extra padding. I often use the Lightning Fast when I want to go light for quick jobs. Think Tank Photo is making the rare move to put their Modular, Skin and Multimedia HDSLR Camera Bags and Belt Systems for Sale at 20% off. So now is the time to buy before Fall and the football season. Here is a break down of what Think Tank Photo has to offer. It will guide you on what system works best for you.

A Modular Component System is the best carrying solution for photographers who require quick and immediate access to their photo equipment. It consists of individual lens and accessory pouches that attach to and slide around a specially designed belt. Since the pouches are modular, the carrying system can be reconfigured to match any assignment, under any condition.
Modular Component Systems are used to shoot sporting events, weddings and other news gathering events where rapid camera gear deployment is essential. The ability to customize a lighter weight, less cumbersome carrying system has also attracted more travel and nature photographers to the Modular Component System.Some photographers choose a minimalist approach to photographing an assignment. Rather than carrying a shoulder bag or backpack, they choose to carry one or two DSLR cameras, ready to shoot.
A Modular Component System facilitates the use of multiple cameras, as well as additional lenses, batteries or flashes. Continue reading for more key features and how your style of photography can benefit from using Think Tank Photo’s Modular Component System.
 

KEY FEATURES OF THE THINK TANK PHOTO MODULAR COMPONENT SYSTEM:

1. ROTATION: the ability to rotate or slide component bags individually around a belt.
All Think Tank Photo Modular, Skin and Multimedia Components are designed to ROTATE on the belt for immediate ACCESS to gear and overall comfort.
Think Tank’s system allows photographers the choice to ROTATE
or LOCK the components on the belt:
- Rotate: enables components to slide freely around the belt.
- Lock: fixes components in static positions on the belt.
Advantages of ROTATION:

A. Weight Distribution: rotating the bags periodically during the
event not only allows access to gear, but makes the belt more
comfortable since the position of the weight is changed.
B. Crowd Navigation: rotating the bags behind the back enables
you to navigate through crowds easily, reducing obstacles to
movement.
C. Alternative Shooting Positions: rotating the bags to different
positions on the belt places gear out of the way while
crouched, laying on the ground, or braced against a wall.
D. 360º Rotation: modular components can rotate 360º around
all Thin Skin and Pro Speed Belts, right over the front buckle.

2. CAPACITY: accommodates the width and depth of fast lenses
Camera lenses such as the 16–35 f2.8, 24–70 f2.8 and 70–200 f2.8,
are considered “fast” lenses because of their wide aperture openings.
These lenses also have very wide lens hoods that are supplied by
the manufacturer. A lens hood blocks errant light from skimming
across the lens, causing lens flare and decreased color saturation.
That function allows photographers to submit the cleanest possible
images. Since the depth and width of each lens hood is different, it is
important to choose a modular pouch that accommodates each one’s
unique dimensions.

• The Think Tank Photo pouches are specifically designed to carry
large lenses with the lens hoods attached in shooting position. For
example, the Modular Lens Changer 50 and the Skin 50 are both
designed for a 16–35 f2.8 with its lens hood in position. The lens
can be easily inserted and withdrawn from either pouch with the
lens hoods facing forward, ready to shoot. No need to fumble about
to reattach the hood in the proper position.
• Think Tank offers special products, like the Lens Changer 75 Pop
Down and the Skin 75 Pop Down. The “Pop Down” is a unique bag
extension that allows the lens hood on a 70–200 f2.8 to remain in
shooting position. If a smaller bag size is preferred, the Pop Down
can remain retracted and the lens hood reversed for storage.


3. SPEED: the ability to quickly change lenses
The Think Tank Photo Modular Component System lets you slide a
lens pouch around the belt for easy access, store the lens without
struggling with its lens hood, and reattach a different lens quickly.
• Think Tank Photo Lens Changers have an open top secured by
an elastic drawstring. Having an open top is the fastest way to pull
a lens from the pouch. No need to contend with a flap, zippered, or
buckled enclosure.
• The Think Tank Photo Skin Series pouches have a flap sealed
closed by hook-and-loop, but the flap can be tucked inside the bag
so the top remains completely open, allowing for ultra-fast lens
changing.
• The most efficient way to change lenses is to keep one empty
pouch on the belt. When a lens is detached from the camera, drop
it into the empty pouch, then pull a different lens from another
pouch and attach it to the camera body. With fewer lenses to
juggle, photographers can concentrate their attention on getting the
shot.
• The Whip it Out bag is the FASTEST way to change out a 70–200
f2.8 telephoto lens. The Whip It Out features a vertical compression
zipper that quickly tightens the entire bag around the lens. When
unzipped, the entire bag loosens, making withdrawing the lens
effortless. The Whip It Out is also the most compact bag made to
carry a 70–200 f2.8 lens with its hood in position.
4. PACKING FOR TRAVEL: compressible and less bulk
For photographers who travel frequently, pouches that compress and
fold make packing and storage easier.
• The Think Tank Photo Skin Series pouches are completely
unpadded. The ability to flatten completely is a tremendous
advantage for photographers who must travel under severely
limited luggage weight and size requirements. A rain cover located
in a zippered pocket at the bottom of each Skin pouch provides
some padding for the lens.
5. STREAMLINING: navigating through a crowd
Lens pouches that stick out too far away from the body make walking
through a crowd extremely difficult.
• Even when a lens is carried inside a Skin Series pouch, it sticks
out a minimal amount from the body. Bulkier systems that use
thick foam become a hindrance when navigating through crowds.
Skin pouches compress flat when empty, therefore reducing a
photographer’s profile when the lens is removed from the pouch.
6. NOISE REDUCTION: silence is golden
Photographers encounter many environments where the sound of
hook-and-loop ripping apart becomes a distraction and nuisance.
• The Think Tank Skin Series pouches have the ability to turn the
ripping sound “On” or “Off” with a special feature called the “Sound
Silencer” on each hook-and-loop strip. When Sound Silencers are
active, a panel covers one side of the hook-and-loop, preventing
noisy ripping sounds.
7. STABILITY: keep your belt on
The belt of a Modular Component System should NOT loosen during
use and it should adjust tighter as needed. Moving around with the
weight of lenses and other equipment, an adjustable belt can become
loose. Needless to say, it can be exceptionally annoying to feel like your
pants are falling down during a photo shoot. Special implementations
need to be used to keep the belt snug around the waist.
• The Think Tank Skin, Pro, and Steroid Speed Belts all use a
special metal Buckle Stop that can be adjusted to a designated
size around on the waist. The Buckle Stop will not loosen the belt
during even vigorous movement and it still allows the belt to be
adjusted tighter around the waist.

STORAGE VS ACTIVE SHOOTING

There is a distinct difference between bags used for transport and

storage versus bags used as a “working” carrying solution while
actively shooting. Camera backpacks and shoulder bags are good
solutions for transporting camera gear from one location to another.
However, once on location, a Modular Component System becomes a
superior “working” solution because all essential gear can be carried
with greater freedom of movement. Active photographers also know
that carrying one or two cameras out of the bag, ready to shoot, is the
best method to be prepared to capture spontaneous moments.

This is a good example of an Airport Acceleration backpack being
used for “transportation” of the gear, but loaded with modular
components. Once at the destination, a photographer can pick and
choose equipment for that particular assignment, attach it to the belt,
and start shooting.
Most event photographers prefer rolling camera bags to transport
their gear because of the amount of equipment they choose to bring to
an assignment. Once at the venue, they use a Modular Component
System. The rolling camera bag can be locked to an immovable
object in a secure location and used as a gear cache to return to as
needed.



























One great thing about a Modular Component System is the ability to
keep components attached to a belt that can simply be placed into a
messenger bag without disassembly. Therefore, a photographer can
use a Modular System with an ordinary bag as a carrying solution
without being identified as a photographer with expensive equipment.




















MODULAR COMPONENT SET-UPS FOR DIFFERENT CATEGORIES OF PHOTOGRAPHY
SPORTS PHOTOGRAPHY:
It is difficult to generalize about what a sports photographer would use
during a particular sporting event. Common considerations are: mobility
during the event, proximity to the action, the available light and the
weather. A camera backpack or a rolling camera bag would be used for
transporting camera equipment to the venue and a Modular Component
System used during the actual shooting of the sporting event.
Pro Speed Belt: Most photographers use the Think Tank Pro Speed
Belt. It is padded but not bulky and allows Modular Components to
slide freely along the belt. Sports players move fast. Photographers
can too, with this comfortable belt.
Skin 75 Pop Down or LC 75 Pop Down or Whip It Out: The 70–200
f2.8 lens is necessary when a player may come closer to a photo
position. The Skin 75 Pop Down and Lens Changer 75 Pop Down
have a “Pop Down” feature that allows the 70–200 lens hood to be
kept in position, ready to shoot. Some sports photographers always
keep a 70–200 f2.8 attached to a DSLR, over the shoulder if a shorter
telephoto is needed quickly. One optional strategy is to use an empty
Skin 75 Pop Down or Lens Changer 75 Pop Down to “holster” the
70–200 with the camera body attached, resting on top of the lens
pouch and the camera strap over the shoulder as a safety. This keeps
the DSLR and 70–200 from wildly swinging around while moving
around the playing field. The Whip It Out is a good option when rapid
access to the 70–200 is necessary and an extra DSLR body is not
available.
Lens Changer 35 or Lens Changer 50 or Skin 50: A sports
photographer who shoots football will typically carry a wide-angle
zoom lens for shooting near the end zone or for post game portraits.
A 24–70 f2.8 or 16–35 f2.8 are usual lens choices. The Lens Changer
35 carries a 24–70 f2.8 with the lens hood in position. A comparable
option for a 24–70 in the Skin Series is the Skin 75 Pop Down, which
easily fits the lens without extending the Pop Down. The 16–35 f2.8
easily fits into either the Lens Changer 50 or Skin 50 with the lens
hood in position.
Lens Drop In: Think Tank makes this very special bag for 1.4x and
2x teleconverters that can be attached to super telephoto lenses,
like a 400 f2.8, to extend the lens’ focal length. The Lens Drop In is
designed with a non-elastic cord as a closure system to keep contents
inside without locking the bag shut. The Lens Drop In also has a soft
interior lining so lens caps do not need to remain attached to the
teleconverter. The lens can simply be dropped into and pulled out of
the bag.
Trim Changer: Sometimes photographers need a primary organizer
for smaller stuff, such as extra batteries, memory cards, a cell phone,
or a teleconverter. As its name suggests, the Trim Changer fulfills this
need without being excessively oversized. Since Modular Components
can rotate 360º around the Thin Skin and Pro Speed Belts, the Trim
Changer can be positioned conveniently right over the belt buckle or
anywhere on the belt.
Pixel Pocket Rocket: Holds 10 CF (Compact Flash) cards without
the individual plastic cases. Shooting sports sometimes requires
“machine gunning” certain peak action moments, making it critical
to have enough memory cards available. The Pixel Pocket Rocket
includes a lanyard for keeping it connected to a bag, to prevent loss.

PHOTOJOURNALISM:
The “trifecta” of lenses for photojournalists is the 70–200 f2.8, 24–70
f2.8 and 16–35 f2.8 lenses. Quite often the 70–200 will be attached to
one DSLR body and the 16–35 to another.
Pro Speed Belt or Thin Skin Belt: Photojournalists may only need
two to three modular bags, depending on preference. The unpadded
Thin Skin Belt is often a good choice because it is extremely compressible
and packs easily for travel.
Skin 75 Pop Down or LC 75 Pop Down or Whip It Out: The 70-200
f2.8 is an essential lens for almost all assignments. The Skin 75 Pop
Down and Lens Changer 75 Pop Down have a “Pop Down” feature
that fits a 70–200 with its lens hood in position ready to shoot. Some
photographers always keep a 70–200 f2.8 attached to a DSLR, over
the shoulder. One optional strategy is to use an empty Skin 75 Pop
Down or Lens Changer 75 Pop Down to “holster” the 70–200 with
the camera body attached, resting it on top of the lens pouch while
keeping the camera strap over the shoulder as a safety. This keeps
the DSLR and 70–200 from swinging uncontrolled while shooting with
the other camera. The Whip It Out is a good option when rapid access
to the 70–200 is necessary but an extra DSLR body is not available.
Lens Changer 35 or Lens Changer 50 or Skin 50: The Lens
Changer 35 carries a 24–70 f2.8 with the lens hood in position. A
comparable option for a 24–70 in the Skin Series is the Skin 75 Pop
Down, which easily fits the lens without extending the Pop Down. The
16–35 f2.8 easily fits into either the Lens Changer 50 or Skin 50 with
the lens hood in position.
Trim Changer: Sometimes photographers need a primary organizer
for smaller stuff, such as extra batteries, memory cards, or a cell
phone. As its name suggests, the Trim Changer fulfills this need
without being excessively oversized. Since Modular Components
can rotate 360º around the Thin Skin and Pro Speed Belts, the Trim
Changer can be positioned conveniently right over the belt buckle or
anywhere on the belt.
Pixel Pocket Rocket: Holds 10 CF (Compact Flash) cards without
the individual plastic cases. Some photojournalists shoot a number of
assignments each day, so it is important to carry a sufficient quantity
of CF cards, and then some. The Pixel Pocket Rocket includes a
lanyard for keeping it connected to a bag, to prevent loss.
WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHY:
Wedding photography is more difficult to generalize because individual
wedding photographers have unique shooting styles and lenses
choices. Some wedding photographers use the same lenses as
photojournalists, with the addition of prime lenses such as the 50 f1.2
or an 85 f1.2 to achieve a specific visual effect. It is also important
that a wedding photographer looks neat and professional. Minimizing
the visual impact of their photo equipment while shooting is an important
consideration. The Skin Component System is a good choice because
they are designed to be visually discreet and lie flat against the body
when empty. The Skin Series pouches also incorporate the “Sound
Silencer” feature for eliminating the ripping sound the hook-and-loop
flap makes when it is opened.
Pro Speed Belt or Skin Belt: Either belt will work in this application.
It just depends on personal preference for a padded or unpadded belt.
Skin 50 AND Skin 75 Pop Down: These two lens cases cover the
entire range of lenses from fast prime lenses to a 70-200mm f2.8, with
its lens hood in position.
Pixel Pocket Rocket: Holds 10 CF (Compact Flash) cards. An extra
pocket for business cards is built in and carries a small stack cards.
The Pixel Pocket Rocket also includes a lanyard for keeping it
connected to a bag, to prevent loss

TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY:
Travel photographers face numerous environmental considerations
including humidity, sand, dust, and salt water. The main “transportation
solution” is typically a carry on size rolling camera bag or backpack.
Modular Components can be packed, empty inside checked luggage,
or used as an alternative to dividers, and use Modular Component
System to work as light and free as possible.
Pro Speed Belt or Skin Belt: Either belt will work in this application.
It depends on personal preference for a padded or unpadded belt.
Digital Holster 20 or 40: Think Tank Digital Holster bags are fully
compatible with any Think Tank belt. Digital Holsters completely
enclose a DSLR with an attached lens and are padded for protection
from the elements. Like our other components, the Digital Holsters
can slide on the belt or be locked into position.
Skin 50 or Skin 75 Pop Down: These lens pouches are very versatile.
They completely flatten when empty, which is helpful for packing and
using in the field. Either bag can complement a Digital Holster on daily
excursions, bringing just the right combination of gear for the moment.
Pixel Pocket Rocket: Holds 10 CF (Compact Flash) cards. An extra
pocket for business cards is built in and carries a small stack cards.
The Pixel Pocket Rocket also includes a lanyard for keeping it connected
to a bag, to prevent loss.
NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY:
Nature photographers typically choose camera backpacks for the
combination of mobility and capacity. However, photo backpacks
must constantly be taken off the shoulders to access gear, which is a
real hassle. Some nature photographers will hike with their preferred
camera and lens out of the bag or attach one to two lens cases to the
backpack’s belt. One option is to use the backpack for transportation
and storage only. Once at the destination, specific equipment can be
loaded into the lighter Modular Component System for use during
daily excursions.
Pro Speed Belt or Skin Belt: Either belt will work in this application.
It depends on personal preference for a padded or unpadded belt.
Lens Changer 50 AND LC 75 Pop Down: These are lightly padded
and suited for attaching to a backpack belt or a Think Tank belt, and
they hold fast lenses such as a 16–35 2.8 or a 70–200 2.8.

CHOOSING A BELT OR HARNESS

Pro Speed Belt (4 sizes): This is the most popular Think Tank Modular
belt type. It is padded, without being too bulky, and is specifically
designed so components rotate around the belt. The Pro Speed Belt
is typically Think Tank’s first recommendation to photographers who
are new to the Modular Component System concept.
Thin Skin Belts (2 sizes): A Skin Belt is made of webbing and does
not have any padding. Many photographers prefer using this belt with
two to three lenses in order to take advantage of its compact size. The
rotating components around the belt allow for the shifting of equipment
for maximum comfort and convenience. The Thin Skin Belt is excellent
for travel because it packs completely flat.
Steroid Speed Belts (4 sizes): This is heavy-duty belt with 3.5” wide
padding and a “Modular Rail” permanently attaches to the outside of
the padding. (The way the Modular Rail is attached limits the Modular
Components’ rotation to only half way around the belt.) Photographers
who favor the Steroid Speed Belt prefer the extra support that the
wider padding provides for carrying heavier loads of equipment
(usually four to six components) on the belt.
Pixel Racing Harness: This harness can be attached to any Think
Tank belt for distributing the weight onto the shoulders in unison with
the belt. We suggest that photographers rotate the components to
various positions on the belt to find a comfortable position for the bags.
In some cases it is better to support the belt with the Pixel Racing
Harness so that the weight can balance between the hips and the
shoulders. The modular components can still be rotated from the back
to the front.
Belly Dancer: This unique harness allows the Modular Components
to be mounted on the front of the body. There are certain types of
photographic genres, such as sports and photojournalism, where it is
advantageous to always have gear situated in front of the body.

CHOOSING THE CORRECT THINK TANK COMPONENTS FOR A MODULAR SYSTEM:
Skin Components:
• Completely unpadded for least amount of bulk.
• Does not protrude away from the body like heavily padded bags.
• When the lens is removed, it lays completely flat against the body.
• Even though it has a “flap,” it can be tucked inside so the pouch
stays completely open for fast lens changing.
• “Sound Silencer” feature allows the hook-and-loop tearing sound to
be switched on or off .
• Ideal weight and easily packable sizes for traveling.
• Seam-sealed rain cover included.
Modular Components:
• Lightly padded with 3mm foam to protect equipment against bumps
and scrapes.
• For super fast lens changing, the top of the Lens Changers are
completely open with an elastic drawstring closure.
• Padded inserts are removable in the Trim Changer and the Speed
Changer.
• Specialized solutions are offered in this collection, like the Lens Drop
In (teleconverters), Whip it Out (for a 70–200 f2.8), and the Lightning
Fast (strobes).
Multimedia Wired Up Components
• Specifically designed for use in combination with video enabled
HDSLRs.
• Specific pouches to carry shotgun microphones, wireless lavalier
microphone sets, and Marantz or Edirol audio recorders.
• Fully compatible with the Multimedia Wired Up belt packs.
Digital Holster Camera Bags
• Five different sizes to carry DSLRs with lenses attached.
• Fully compatible with Think Tank belts.
• They can attach and either slide on the belt or be locked into position.
• Features the zippered “pop down” on the bottom of the bag so that a
lens hood can be extended and in position.

Tuesday, August 2, 2011

Think Tank Photo is having a sale!

As a professional photographer for over 25 years I've used various camera bags. Hands down Think Tank Photo products manufacture the best camera bags. If you are in the market for modular belt systems or individual modular components, good news, Think Tank Photo is having a sale! With this sale, you can buy the hallmark six-piece Modular Set and five-piece Skin Set (which are already discounted 20%), or any of the individual modular components, good news, Think Tank Photo is having a sale! With this sale, you can buy the hallmark six-piece Modular Set and five-piece Skin Set (which are already discounted 20%), or any of the individual Modular or Skin components for 20% off. http://bit.ly/FivePieceSkinSet
Al Diaz and his friends wearing the 
Think Tank Photo Modular Belt System
Lynne Sladky of the Associated Press

PGA Photographer Stan Badz


Photographer Larry Marano at Sony Ericsson Open. 

Monday, August 1, 2011

Taco vendor, judge, Iraq vet collar suspected thief

Burglary suspect James Dewey Bretthauer was taken into custody by City of Miami Police after being chased down by taco vendor Moises Gonzalez, seen here at his taco stand Taqueria Mexican "Orale!." Miami Dade County Drug Court Judge Deborah White-Labora and then held at gun point by Iragi war veteran Ian Vaquero. Bretthauer, using roller blades, grabed a camera belonging to Miami Herald Photographer Al Diaz who was on assignment to photograph the Taco vendor at 17th Street and 27th Avenue in Miami.



A suspected thief led pursuers on a chase that ended when an Iraq war veteran sorted things out the Miami way -- with a gun.
A subpoena just arrived for me as a witness on the case of James Dewey Bretthauer. The trial will be held August 8th. Here is the back story.


BY HENNING ENGELAGE

Heard the one about the judge, the taco vendor, the pistol-packing Iraq war vet and the thief on roller blades?
It apparently happened Wednesday when Al Diaz of The Miami Herald was preparing to photograph the Taqueria Mexicana Orale taco truck at Northwest 27th Avenue and 17th Street for a feature story. He briefly placed his camera on a chair to set up some lighting equipment.
Seizing the moment, a man on wheels snatched the camera and whooshed down 16th. Someone munching a taco yelled, ``That guy just grabbed your camera!''
Taco stand owner Moises Gonzales, incensed at the interruption, tore out on foot after the roller-blader. A food inspector joined him.
That's when Deborah White-Labora happened along. A judge in Miami-Dade's drug court, White-Labora was driving a white Scion minivan with her two children, 17-year-old Christopher and 20-year-old Amanda, having just visited the bank to pick up some travelers checks en route to Miami International for a flight to Peru.
Gonzales flagged down the van, barked out ``follow that man!'' or words to that effect, and the pursuit continued.
The minivan overtook a roller-blader at 3071 NW 18th Ter. Christopher bounded out of the car and ``pounced like a cobra'' on the skater, said Amanda. Gonzales, the taco maker, joined the fray.
Ian Vaquero, in whose front yard the chase ended, didn't know what to make of the wrestling match. So the Iraq war vet sorted things out the Miami way, drawing his 9mm Smith & Wesson and telling everyone to freeze.
``Thank God for the Second Amendment and armed civilians,'' said Christopher.
The final tally:
The skater, James Dewey Bretthauer, was hauled off to jail, charged with theft.
The judge's children made it to the airport.
Joe Zaragoza, a customer at the taco stand (and commander of Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 1608), was so impressed by the citizen intervention that he gave Gonzales and Vaquero each a $100 reward on the spot.
Diaz, who had to guard the rest of his gear while the others gave chase, got his $5,000 camera back, albeit damaged. He got a photo of the alleged thief, using a second camera.
``I never thought photographing food vendors would be a dangerous affair,'' said the veteran journalist, who has covered everything from armed invasions to fashion shows. ``But the taco stand owner, the drug court judge, the boy and the Iraq war veteran, they are my heroes.''
















Here is the backstory to the backstory.
I photographed Miami-Dade’s drug court judge, Deborah White-Labora, in court a year prior to the robbery. The portrait of US Army Iraq war veteran Ian Vaquero appeared on the front page of the Miami Herald three months before the robbery.
This is drug court judge Deborah White-Labora in Miami-Dade Court, 2009. the Eleventh Judicial Circuit of Florida was the first in the nation to implement Drug Court, a diversion and treatment program for drug offenders which is overseen by the Court. The Program offers drug offenders the chance to avoid prosecution, get off drugs and change their lives in a positive direction.

Ian Vaquero, is a veteran from the Iraq war. He served in the U.S. Army during the invasion of Iraq in 2003.