Sunday, October 13, 2019

Photojournalist Patrick Farrell has joined the blog with his weekly feature, The Sunday Still. Farrell selects one image each week that showcases the best photojournalism by photojournalists from around the world. The feature runs weekly in The Sunday Long Read. The goal of the newsletter, edited by Don Van Natta Jr. and Jacob Feldman, is to put the week’s best journalism in your hands every Sunday morning.

The Sunday Still
from Patrick Farrell


Oil-Stained Lives

While shooting striking news images for a story about fisher families struggling in the environmental fallout of Venezuela’s collapsing oil industry, AP photographer Rodrigo Abd spotted an opportunity for a different way to tell the story. He returned to the oil-covered shores of Lake Maracaibo in Cabimas with a vintage box camera and tripod. In haunting black-and-white portraits, Abd depicts the human toll of the tidal bay’s industrial decay in the straight-on stares, premature wrinkles and blackened clothing of his individual subjects. By slowing time and removing the distraction of color, his images suggest another time, demonstrating that 83 years after Dorothea Lange shot “Migrant Mother,” the most vulnerable lives continue to suffer the most from man-made environmental disasters.

Patrick Farrell, the curator of The Sunday Still, is the 2009 Pulitzer Prize-winner for Breaking News Photography for The Miami Herald, where he worked from 1987 to 2019. He is currently a Lecturer in the Department of Journalism and Media Management at the University of Miami School of Communication.

Friday, October 11, 2019

National Press Photographers Foundation: Grants & Scholarships

NPPF GRANTS & SCHOLARSHIPS


Bob Lynn Grant Established at NPPF

The National Press Photographers Foundation is pleased to announce the Bob Lynn Grant, established by Bob and Millie Lynn.

The $4,000 grant will be awarded annually for 10 years to working professionals or photojournalism students to support documentary photojournalism projects.

The full story is here. Outstanding!!

NPPF 2020 Scholarship Competition is open
The National Press Photographers Foundation announces the opening of the 2020 scholarship competition.

"We award ten $2,000 scholarships for graduate and undergraduate students studying photojournalism in graduate programs or four-year undergraduate programs in the United States," said Dr. James W. Brown, NPPF chair of scholarships and awards.

The deadline for entering portfolios is December 2, 2019. Applications should be started soon so that your faculty recommenders have time to respond.
Your online application and portfolio may be edited up to the deadline at midnight, eastern time, on December 2. The deadline allows work created this semester to be included. You may read about our scholarships here

Thursday, October 10, 2019

Bold Beauty Project Exhibit at Nova Southeastern University October 14, 2019

 Bold Beauty Project Exhibit 
Nova Southeastern University 
October 14, 2019
Reception will be in the Performing & Visual Arts Lobby 5:45 pm - 6:45 pm.
Panel Discussion will be held in the Black Box Theater 
6:45 pm - 7:45 pm.

Don Taft University Center 
3301 College Ave. Davie, Fl 33314

For Campus and Parking Directions:


Sunday, October 6, 2019

THE SUNDAY STILL: Capital Hill Intrigue

Photojournalist Patrick Farrell has joined the blog with his weekly feature, The Sunday Still. Farrell selects one image each week that showcases the best photojournalism by photojournalists from around the world. The feature runs weekly in The Sunday Long Read. The goal of the newsletter, edited by Don Van Natta Jr. and Jacob Feldman, is to put the week’s best journalism in your hands every Sunday morning.
The Sunday Still
from Patrick Farrell


Capitol Hill Intrigue

How do you cover a closed-door deposition as a photographer? Backpedaling in a pack through fluorescent-lit hallways, opportunities are reduced to closing elevators doors and short sprints to vehicles with dark-tinted windows. Washington, D.C.-based photojournalist Sarah Silbiger, shooting for Bloomberg, captured one of the most striking images yet from the Trump impeachment inquiry by demonstrating dogged persistence, patience and an eye for political intrigue. Taking on windshield reflections and the dwindling light of day after a 10-hour hearing, Silbiger’s photo of former U.S. special envoy to Ukraine Kurt Volker on Oct. 3 is rich with ambient light from the car’s interior and the setting sun. The phalanx of police officers in the background adds depth to a photograph that conveys there is still much to be seen on Capitol Hill.

Patrick Farrell, the curator of The Sunday Still, is the 2009 Pulitzer Prize-winner for Breaking News Photography for The Miami Herald, where he worked from 1987 to 2019. He is currently a Lecturer in the Department of Journalism and Media Management at the University of Miami School of Communication.


Sunday, September 29, 2019


Photojournalist Patrick Farrell has joined the blog with his weekly feature, The Sunday Still. Farrell selects one image each week that showcases the best photojournalism by photojournalists from around the world. The feature runs weekly in The Sunday Long Read. The goal of the newsletter, edited by Don Van Natta Jr. and Jacob Feldman, is to put the week’s best journalism in your hands every Sunday morning.

The Sunday Still
from Patrick Farrell


Behind the Photo

Demonstrating incredible calm and professional instinct to get the photo, AP photographer Dieu-Nalio Chery documented his own shooting on Sept. 23, when ruling party Senator Jean Marie Ralph Féthière fired a pistol as opposition supporters confronted him outside Haiti’s Senate building in Port-au-Prince. Chery, who survived with a bullet fragment in his chin, captured the best image of the event before he was taken to the hospital. The Committee to Protest Journalists called for an immediate investigation, noting Chery was wearing a vest marked with the word "Press.” Chery has been closely documenting a tumultuous year in Haiti as demonstrators protest worsening economic conditions and call for the resignation of Haiti’s president amid accusations of government corruption.

Patrick Farrell, the curator of The Sunday Still, is the 2009 Pulitzer Prize-winner for Breaking News Photography for The Miami Herald, where he worked from 1987 to 2019. He is currently a Lecturer in the Department of Journalism and Media Management at the University of Miami School of Communication.

Thursday, September 26, 2019

U.S. Denies Citizenship to Prominent Miami Photographer Delio Regueral

FABIOLA SANTIAGO

U.S. denies citizenship to prominent Miami photographer, tells him he’ll be deported | Opinion

Duration -:-
U.S. denies citizenship to prominent Miami photographer
The Trump administration denied the U.S. citizenship to Miami photographer Delio Regueral, a legal resident with no criminal record. 

 
Delio Regueral, 55, has lived in Miami for 25 years. Like hundreds of thousands of Cuban nationals before him, in 1997 he became a legal resident through the Cuban Adjustment Act. 
He is the well-regarded owner of Delio Photo Studio and a do-gooder who volunteers his time at cultural community events and served as vice president of an organization that helps children with autism.
On the walls of his photo studio on Coral Way hang evocative portraits of stars like jazz greats Arturo Sandoval and Bebo Valdés, local politicians, and scores of families marking milestones. Artful or commercial work, no job is too small. Passport photos, anyone? Corporate head shots?
“My family depends on me,” Regueral says. “If I were to be deported, it would be their destruction. We would lose the house in six months.” 
The rest of his family — his wife and the two sons who arrived with him in Miami on a flight from Spain in 1994, now ages 31 and 25 — all became naturalized American citizens during previous administrations. 
His 15-year-old daughter was born here.
So why is Regueral, the head of household, being denied citizenship — and told to show up in January before an immigration judge for a deportation hearing?
On the walls of his photo studio on Coral Way hang evocative portraits of stars like jazz greats Arturo Sandoval and Bebo Valdés, local politicians, and scores of families marking milestones. Artful or commercial work, no job is too small. Passport photos, anyone? Corporate head shots?
“My family depends on me,” Regueral says. “If I were to be deported, it would be their destruction. We would lose the house in six months.” 
The rest of his family — his wife and the two sons who arrived with him in Miami on a flight from Spain in 1994, now ages 31 and 25 — all became naturalized American citizens during previous administrations. 
His 15-year-old daughter was born here.
So why is Regueral, the head of household, being denied citizenship — and told to show up in January before an immigration judge for a deportation hearing?
A Department of Homeland Security document dated Sept. 4 accuses Regueral of gaining admission to the U.S. by “fraud or willfully misrepresenting a material fact.”
But the practice the Trump administration is now labeling “fraud” — that he entered the United States with a visa waiver stamped on his Spanish passport and that he adjusted to residency as provided under the CAA as a Cuban — has been standard operating practice for tens of thousands of Cubans who have arrived via Spain and other countries. 
People who are born in Cuba and have Spanish-born grandparents, particularly, are eligible for Spanish citizenship and passports. That’s how Regueral was able to flee Cuba in 1985. Many Cuban Americans have dual U.S.-Spanish citizenship. 
“This is unheard of,” immigration attorney Wilfredo Allen said of a person like Regueral being put in removal proceedings. “This is creating terror, panic in our community.” 
The Cuban Adjustment Act allows Cubans who are on U.S. soil who have been inspected and admitted or paroled at a point of entry to apply for residency one year and a day after arrival. People without criminal convictions have been routinely approved for decades.
Regueral became a resident during the Clinton administration in 1997 without any problems.
The Immigration and Naturalization Service, as the USCIS was known then, didn’t have any issues with the fact that Regueral in 1988 had asked for asylum in Miami during a stopover on a return Madrid-Venezuela flight — and was denied. 
Regueral left the United States voluntarily and returned to Spain, but as he says in a short biography of his art career, he yearned to live “in the land of the free and the home of the brave.” 
When his photo studio ventures in Spain and Venezuela didn’t pan out, he saw no alternative but to try his luck again in Miami. And so Regueral did what thousands of Cubans were doing: travel with his family with a visa waiver. And he was legally admitted.
So why the pushback now?
Is the Trump administration going to rescind the residency and deny the citizenship of all of the tens of thousands of Cubans who have come from Spain and third countries with a visa waiver? The same Cubans they approved for entry at the airport, making them legally eligible to adjust their status via the CAA? 
“What they are doing to Delio, in a best-case scenario, is the result of an overzealous agent’s decision, and in the worst-case scenario, a new policy coming from the top to restrict further people adjusted with the CAA,” said Allen, who has known Regueral for 20 years.
Had Regueral not applied for citizenship some two years ago, prompting a review of his immigration and travel history, he might not be facing such dire consequences as removal proceedings.
“I’m being judged on one mistake,” he said, referring to his spontaneous and unsuccessful bid for asylum 20 years ago. “Does the rest of my life not matter? Does the breakup of my family not matter?”
Indeed, nothing is gained by the U.S. government’s taking away of a father, a family’s livelihood, and an artist from a community where he has been allowed to live — legally — for decades now.
But the larger question for the administration is this: Is the Cuban Adjustment Act — passed by Congress in 1966 and signed into law by Lyndon B. Johnson — all of a sudden, at Trump’s whim, just a useless piece of paper?
It takes an act of Congress to do away with the CAA — not only a presidential desire to disenfranchise a sector of the Cuban-American community that is perceived to be more liberal than the 1960s historic exile. 
Yes, this is the underlying motivation for cracking down on Cuban immigration now — and the reason why you don’t hear the Cuban American Republican establishment forcefully condemning drastic policy shifts.
Despite the sanctions and tough talk against the human rights-violating Cuban regime, the administration is undertaking mass deportations, stalling legal family reunification, leaving asylum seekers stranded in Mexico and other countries — and now, as recent high-profile cases show, denying naturalization to Cubans.
In a letter to DHS after the recent deportation of 120 Cubans on a single flight with the promise of more to come, U.S. Rep. Debbie Mucarsel-Powell, D-Miami, expressed concern and demanded answers.
“In contrast to the rhetoric, your Department apparently now views Cuba as safe to return those who have sought asylum from Communism … On their face, these two positions are not compatible,” she wrote. “Either the Cuban government continues to persecute its own citizens under tyrannical rule, or the Cuban government has reformed enough to safely return those who fled to the United States without fear of retribution — not both.”
For 60 years, Cubans have found safe haven in the United States.
With each day, comes mounting evidence that the Trump administration is ending those privileges on every front.

Profile Image of Fabiola Santiago
Award-winning columnist Fabiola Santiago has been writing about all things Miami since 1980, when the Mariel boatlift became her first front-page story. A Cuban refugee child of the Freedom Flights, she’s also the author of essays, short fiction, and the novel “Reclaiming Paris.”

Read more here: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/news-columns-blogs/fabiola-santiago/article235399787.html?fbclid=IwAR0LkiiuZsJ9d5oSOXCKNPWLCHQmbPlNpsJhWFUqYL4OAUUoeowPkGJPMZE#storylink=cpy

Read more here: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/news-columns-blogs/fabiola-santiago/article235399787.html?fbclid=IwAR0LkiiuZsJ9d5oSOXCKNPWLCHQmbPlNpsJhWFUqYL4OAUUoeowPkGJPMZE#storylink=cpy


Read more here: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/news-columns-blogs/fabiola-santiago/article235399787.html?fbclid=IwAR0LkiiuZsJ9d5oSOXCKNPWLCHQmbPlNpsJhWFUqYL4OAUUoeowPkGJPMZE#storylink=cpy

Read more here: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/news-columns-blogs/fabiola-santiago/article235399787.html?fbclid=IwAR0LkiiuZsJ9d5oSOXCKNPWLCHQmbPlNpsJhWFUqYL4OAUUoeowPkGJPMZE#storylink=cpy

Tuesday, September 24, 2019

The Alexia Photojournalism Grants

https://www.alexiafoundation.org/blog/2019/09/23/one-week-left-to-apply-for-the-alexia-professional-and-student-grants/Shauncina, age 12 hugging her aunt Jada, 39 y.o. near the Crow Hill Sun Dance grounds. "I can take you in, my girl..." - Jada says to Shauncina. Spirit Lake, North Dakota. April, 2013. By Rena Effendi, 2018 Alexia Professional Grant Recipient.

One Week Left to Apply for The Alexia

There are exactly seven days remaining to submit your application for The Alexia Professional Grant and for our three Alexia Student Grants. The deadline is this Monday, Sept. 30 at 11.59 p.m. Eastern U.S. Time.

The winner of The Alexia Professional Grant will receive $20,000 to produce a proposed story. The first place winner of The Alexia Student Grant will receive a cash grant of $1,000 to produce the proposed story and funding for a semester at Syracuse University. The First Place grant is equivalent to a semester-long fellowship or residency at Syracuse University, taking three classes, working on projects and further developing skills with the support of a world-class faculty.

Two student finalists will receive a $500 cash grant and may attend a Momenta Workshop or a MediaStorm one day workshop or four day workshop during the calendar year after being named a finalist.

Student eligibility has changed for the 2019 competition. Any student who is currently enrolled, or who graduated in May 2019 or is currently on an internship will be eligible to apply.

Do not wait any longer. Submit your materials today. And please share this reminder with anyone who should apply!

Learn more and apply at alexiafoundation.org
Apply Now

Tuesday, September 17, 2019

LEICA STORE MIAMI: 4-Time Pulitzer Prize Winning Photographer William Snyder, Thursday September 19th, 7PM

TALK & BOOK SIGNING
4-Time Pulitzer Prize Winning Photographer William Snyder


Thursday, September 19th, 2019   |   7:00 - 8:30 PM   |   Learn More & RSVP

Come see William Snyder’s pictures and hear his stories during this special presentation. He will discuss his experience with The Who and talk about his Pulitzer Prize winning career in photojournalism. William will be signing copies of his new book, Join Together (With The Band), after the talk. This is a museum quality, collectable hardcover coffee table book that captures The Who's explosive stage shows as well as quiet moments off-stage in many never-before-seen photographs spanning 1980 through 2017.
 
RSVP

Book Signing:

William will be signing copies of his new book, Join Together (With The Band), after the talk. This is a museum quality, collectable hardcover coffee table book that captures The Who's explosive stage shows as well as quiet moments off-stage in many never-before-seen photographs spanning 1980 through 2017. The exclusive photographs in this book were taken by William Snyder who has been the band's official photographer of more than seventeen years. The foreword is by Pearl Jam frontman Eddie Vedder. The book is bolstered by the full blessing and support of Pete Townshend and Roger Daltrey.
- Join Together is an over-sized book measuring 12 x 12 x 1.0 inches with approximately 180 pages.
50 Percent of the book profits go to The Who’s charity, Teen Cancer America.
*You can buy the book at the presentation or you can also purchase it at his websitewww.jointogetherwiththebook.com
William Snyder, a four-time Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist, has traveled many miles and covered a myriad of assignments. He began shooting photographs for The Gleaner in his hometown of Henderson, KY at the age of 14 and rode his bicycle to assignments or hitched a ride with his mother.

Snyder graduated from the Rochester Institute of Technology with highest honors and a BS in photography. He recently returned to RIT to teach and is the Chair of the Photojournalism program. Shortly after graduation, William began working for The Miami News in 1981 where he covered many of the city’s major news stories – riots, Miami Dolphins in the Super Bowl, Haitian boat people, and space shuttle launches.

In 1983 Snyder moved to The Dallas Morning News. In the 15 years he was a photographer at The News, he covered the first democratic elections in Haiti and Romania, the explosion of the Shuttle Challenger, the ’91 coup attempt in the Soviet Union, the re-unification of Germany, healthcare in the US federal prison system, hunger in Dallas, MLK streets across the US, AIDS orphans in Romania, AIDS in Uganda and Thailand, illegal immigration in Russia and the Czech Republic, cotton farmers in Nicaragua, seal hunting in Newfoundland, Summer Olympics in Barcelona and Atlanta, Winter Olympics in Calgary, Albertville and Nagano, two NCAA Final Fours, two Super Bowls, two Republican Conventions and the re-emergence of religion across Russia while traveling on the Trans-Siberian Railroad.
Four-time Pulitzer Prize recipient:
  • In 1989 Snyder and two colleagues were awarded the Pulitzer Prize in Explanatory Journalism for their special section detailing how the National Transportation Safety Board conducts an investigation.
  • In 1991 Snyder was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in Feature Photography for photographs depicting the inhumane treatment of orphans in Romania’s “home for the irrecoverables.”
  • In 1993 Snyder and a fellow photographer were awarded the Pulitzer Prize in Spot News Photography for their work at the 1992 Barcelona Summer Olympics.
  • In 2006, as Director of Photography, Snyder guided The Dallas Morning News' staff to the Pulitzer Prize in Breaking News Photography for their coverage of Hurricane Katrina.

To RSVP, email info@leicastoremiami.com.
As always, our events are kindly sponsored by Brooklyn Brewery. Stop by, bring a friend, and try out Brooklyn's latest brews.